The Coordination Hub

North American Movement In Support of Kurds

The Coordination Hub is where we unite the movement in North America to promote the rights of Kurds to live in freedom, security, and self-determination, in all four parts of Kurdistan.

US capitol building

Solidarity from Friends Beyond the Mountains

The Coordination Hub is a place for those who support the Kurdish people, both groups of Kurds and groups in solidarity, to communicate and coordinate their efforts in North America. On this page, individuals can find groups to join, find events in North America, or add their group or event. Organizations can join The Coordination Hub Slack workspace, where delegates from each group announce, discuss, and coordinate efforts in North America.

The Hub is hosted by the North American Kurdish Alliance, but it’s not run by anyone. It’s a meeting place to work in harmony as one, united movement. Together, we are the friends beyond the mountains. Click the button below to add your group and join The Coordination Hub Slack workspace.

Join a Group in Your Region

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Groups Who Support Kurds in North America

Kurdish Cultural & Educational Groups

NEKA Logo
American Kurdish Association
Knoxville Kurdish Community Council

Lobbying, Advocacy, and Solidarity Groups

NAKA Logo
Kevok

Political Groups in Solidarity

Deman Utopia Logo
Olympia Assembly Logo
Institute for Social Ecology Logo
IVR Logo
RAM Logo
IRPGFNA
Socialist Party of Eastern Alabama Logo
DGC IWW logo
Tidewater IWW

Events in North America

Who Are The Kurds?

The Kurds are the largest stateless ethnic group on Earth. Composed of a diversity of religions, dialects, and ideologies, Kurds share a common history and home in Kurdistan. Kurdistan is the mountainous region that crosses the borders of present-day south-eastern Turkey, northern Iraq, western Iran, and northern Syria; each called Bakur, Başûr, Rojhelat, and Rojava, the Kurdish words for north, south, east, and west.

The Kurds have been persecuted and oppressed under all four nation-states that claim the land under their feet for generations. Kurds have been subjected to genocide and brutal repression, denied autonomy and even the freedom to be Kurdish, to speak the language or practice Kurdish culture.

The Ottoman empire dissolved in the early 20th century, on the losing side of the war alongside Germany in World War I, and was occupied and partitioned by the Allied powers after the war, which ultimately created the nation-states of Syria, Turkey, and Iraq, among others. The map of the region was completely redrawn and borders and states continued to change after World War II, all excluding a Kurdish government.

Kurdish nationalist movements and uprisings began in the late 19th century, under the Ottoman Empire, with a resurgence after its dissolution, and were met with two centuries of repression and denial of self-determination by Turkey, Iraq, Syria, and Iran. Present day Kurdistan chiefly has two Kurdish governments, with two different approaches to Kurdish autonomy. Başûr has the Kurdistan Regional Government, a semi-autonomous regional government that’s part of Iraq, with a parliamentary government. The government in Rojava is the Federation of Northern Syria, a stateless democracy with a democratic confederal system of autonomous communities, with a pluralist social contract that includes the ethnic groups of Kurds, Arabs, Syriacs, Arameans, Turkmen, Armenians, and Chechens.

Kurds in Rojava and Başûr have suffered greatly from the rise of and occupation by DAESH (ISIS) and have been the key fighters on the ground defeating DAESH, liberating cities and towns. Enjoying support primarily from the US against common enemies, Saddam Hussein and DAESH, Kurds have enjoyed excellent and increasingly warm relations with the US and coalition forces. Though the same can’t be said for Kurds in Bakur, whose struggle for autonomy against the Turkish state has complicated relations with NATO allies, Washington and Ankara, with differences over common official opposition to Kurds resisting the Turkish state in Bakur and US support for Kurds in Rojava, who Ankara sees as the same.

If my mother tongue is shaking the foundations of your state, it probably means that you built your state on my land.”

Apê Musa (Musa Anter)

Kurdish writer, assassinated by the Turkish secret services in 1992.